Last tested: 20 Feb, 2018

superagent vulnerabilities

elegant & feature rich browser / node HTTP with a fluent API

View on npm

superagent (latest)

Published 14 Feb, 2018

Known vulnerabilities0
Vulnerable paths0
Dependencies24

No known vulnerabilities in superagent

Security wise, superagent seems to be a safe package to use.
Over time, new vulnerabilities may be disclosed on superagent and other packages. To easily find, fix and prevent such vulnerabilties, protect your repos with Snyk!

Vulnerable versions of superagent

Fixed in 3.7.0

Denial of Service (DoS)

low severity

Detailed paths

  • Introduced through: superagent@3.6.3

Overview

superagent is elegant & feature rich browser / node HTTP with a fluent API.

Affected versions of the package are vulnerable to Denial of Service (DoS) attacks. It uncompresses responses in memory, and a server controlled by a malicious user may send a specially crafted zip file which will then unzip in the target server and will cause excessive CPU consumption. This is also known as a Zip Bomb.

Remediation

Upgrade superagent to version 3.7.0 or higher.

References

Fixed in 2.0.0

Prototype Override Protection Bypass

high severity
  • Vulnerable module: qs
  • Introduced through: qs@2.3.3

Detailed paths

  • Introduced through: superagent@1.8.5 > qs@2.3.3

Overview

qs is a querystring parser that supports nesting and arrays, with a depth limit.

By default qs protects against attacks that attempt to overwrite an object's existing prototype properties, such as toString(), hasOwnProperty(),etc.

From qs documentation:

By default parameters that would overwrite properties on the object prototype are ignored, if you wish to keep the data from those fields either use plainObjects as mentioned above, or set allowPrototypes to true which will allow user input to overwrite those properties. WARNING It is generally a bad idea to enable this option as it can cause problems when attempting to use the properties that have been overwritten. Always be careful with this option.

Overwriting these properties can impact application logic, potentially allowing attackers to work around security controls, modify data, make the application unstable and more.

In versions of the package affected by this vulnerability, it is possible to circumvent this protection and overwrite prototype properties and functions by prefixing the name of the parameter with [ or ]. e.g. qs.parse("]=toString") will return {toString = true}, as a result, calling toString() on the object will throw an exception.

Example:

qs.parse('toString=foo', { allowPrototypes: false })
// {}

qs.parse("]=toString", { allowPrototypes: false })
// {toString = true} <== prototype overwritten

For more information, you can check out our blog.

Disclosure Timeline

  • February 13th, 2017 - Reported the issue to package owner.
  • February 13th, 2017 - Issue acknowledged by package owner.
  • February 16th, 2017 - Partial fix released in versions 6.0.3, 6.1.1, 6.2.2, 6.3.1.
  • March 6th, 2017 - Final fix released in versions 6.4.0,6.3.2, 6.2.3, 6.1.2 and 6.0.4

Remediation

Upgrade qs to version 6.4.0 or higher. Note: The fix was backported to the following versions 6.3.2, 6.2.3, 6.1.2, 6.0.4.

References

Regular Expression Denial of Service (ReDoS)

low severity
  • Vulnerable module: mime
  • Introduced through: mime@1.3.4

Detailed paths

  • Introduced through: superagent@1.8.5 > mime@1.3.4

Overview

mime is a comprehensive, compact MIME type module.

Affected versions of this package are vulnerable to Regular expression Denial of Service (ReDoS). It uses regex the following regex /.*[\.\/\\]/ in its lookup, which can cause a slowdown of 2 seconds for 50k characters.

The Regular expression Denial of Service (ReDoS) is a type of Denial of Service attack. Many Regular Expression implementations may reach extreme situations that cause them to work very slowly (exponentially related to input size), allowing an attacker to exploit this and can cause the program to enter these extreme situations by using a specially crafted input and cause the service to excessively consume CPU, resulting in a Denial of Service.

You can read more about Regular Expression Denial of Service (ReDoS) on our blog.

Remediation

Upgrade mime to versions 1.4.1, 2.0.3 or higher.

References

Fixed in 0.21.0

Regular Expression Denial of Service (DoS)

medium severity
  • Vulnerable module: ms
  • Introduced through: debug@2.0.0

Detailed paths

  • Introduced through: superagent@0.20.0 > debug@2.0.0 > ms@0.6.2

Overview

ms is a tiny milisecond conversion utility.

Affected versions of this package are vulnerable to a Regular expression Denial of Service (ReDoS) attack when converting a time period string (i.e. "2 days", "1h") into milliseconds integer. A malicious user could pas extremely long strings to ms(), causing the server take a long time to process, subsequently blocking the event loop for that extended period.

Details

The Regular expression Denial of Service (ReDoS) is a type of Denial of Service attack. Many Regular Expression implementations may reach extreme situations that cause them to work very slowly (exponentially related to input size), allowing an attacker to exploit this and can cause the program to enter these extreme situations by using a specially crafted input and cause the service to excessively consume CPU, resulting in a Denial of Service.

Remediation

Upgrade ms to version 0.7.1.

If direct dependency upgrade is not possible, use snyk wizard to patch this vulnerability.

References

Regular Expression Denial of Service (ReDoS)

low severity
  • Vulnerable module: debug
  • Introduced through: debug@2.0.0

Detailed paths

  • Introduced through: superagent@0.20.0 > debug@2.0.0

Overview

debug is a JavaScript debugging utility modelled after Node.js core's debugging technique..

debug uses printf-style formatting. Affected versions of this package are vulnerable to Regular expression Denial of Service (ReDoS) attacks via the the %o formatter (Pretty-print an Object all on a single line). It used a regular expression (/\s*\n\s*/g) in order to strip whitespaces and replace newlines with spaces, in order to join the data into a single line. This can cause a very low impact of about 2 seconds matching time for data 50k characters long.

The Regular expression Denial of Service (ReDoS) is a type of Denial of Service attack. Many Regular Expression implementations may reach extreme situations that cause them to work very slowly (exponentially related to input size), allowing an attacker to exploit this and can cause the program to enter these extreme situations by using a specially crafted input and cause the service to excessively consume CPU, resulting in a Denial of Service.

You can read more about Regular Expression Denial of Service (ReDoS) on our blog.

Remediation

Upgrade debug to version 2.6.9, 3.1.0 or higher.

References

Regular Expression Denial of Service (ReDoS)

low severity
  • Vulnerable module: ms
  • Introduced through: debug@2.0.0

Detailed paths

  • Introduced through: superagent@0.20.0 > debug@2.0.0 > ms@0.6.2

Overview

ms is a tiny millisecond conversion utility.

Affected versions of this package are vulnerable to Regular Expression Denial of Service (ReDoS) due to an incomplete fix for previously reported vulnerability npm:ms:20151024. The fix limited the length of accepted input string to 10,000 characters, and turned to be insufficient making it possible to block the event loop for 0.3 seconds (on a typical laptop) with a specially crafted string passed to ms() function.

Proof of concept

ms = require('ms');
ms('1'.repeat(9998) + 'Q') // Takes about ~0.3s

Note: Snyk's patch for this vulnerability limits input length to 100 characters. This new limit was deemed to be a breaking change by the author. Based on user feedback, we believe the risk of breakage is very low, while the value to your security is much greater, and therefore opted to still capture this change in a patch for earlier versions as well. Whenever patching security issues, we always suggest to run tests on your code to validate that nothing has been broken.

For more information on Regular Expression Denial of Service (ReDoS) attacks, go to our blog.

Disclosure Timeline

  • Feb 9th, 2017 - Reported the issue to package owner.
  • Feb 11th, 2017 - Issue acknowledged by package owner.
  • April 12th, 2017 - Fix PR opened by Snyk Security Team.
  • May 15th, 2017 - Vulnerability published.
  • May 16th, 2017 - Issue fixed and version 2.0.0 released.
  • May 21th, 2017 - Patches released for versions >=0.7.1, <=1.0.0.

Remediation

Upgrade ms to version 2.0.0 or higher.

References

Fixed in 0.19.0

Denial of Service (Memory Exhaustion)

high severity
  • Vulnerable module: qs
  • Introduced through: qs@0.6.6

Detailed paths

  • Introduced through: superagent@0.18.2 > qs@0.6.6

Overview

qs is a querystring parser that supports nesting and arrays, with a depth limit.

During parsing, the qs module may create a sparse area (an array where no elements are filled), and grow that array to the necessary size based on the indices used on it. An attacker can specify a high index value in a query string, thus making the server allocate a respectively big array. Truly large values can cause the server to run out of memory and cause it to crash - thus enabling a Denial-of-Service attack.

Remediation

Upgrade qs to version 1.0.0 or greater. In these versions, qs introduced a low limit on the index value, preventing such an attack

References

Denial of Service (Event Loop Blocking)

medium severity
  • Vulnerable module: qs
  • Introduced through: qs@0.6.6

Detailed paths

  • Introduced through: superagent@0.18.2 > qs@0.6.6

Overview

qs is a querystring parser that supports nesting and arrays, with a depth limit.

When parsing a string representing a deeply nested object, qs will block the event loop for long periods of time. Such a delay may hold up the server's resources, keeping it from processing other requests in the meantime, thus enabling a Denial-of-Service attack.

Remediation

Update qs to version 1.0.0 or higher. In these versions, qs enforces a max object depth (along with other limits), limiting the event loop length and thus preventing such an attack.

References